How do YOU define and design a creative and entrepreneurial Canada?

On Nov. 14, 2016, Startup Canada hosted a nationally live-streamed panel of creative entrepreneurs, students, academics, and industry thought leaders. The panel discussed the development of talent, creative industries, social and entrepreneurial innovation, and the role of creativity and entrepreneurialism in defining the Canadian identity. Watch the livestream now!

Throughout Fall 2016, more than 1,000 Canadian artists, content creators, cultural entrepreneurs and leaders within the innovation, entrepreneurship and academic communities shared their vision for a creative and entrepreneurial Canada through on-the-ground forums in six cities, multiple national digital events including a live-stream town hall, videos and dozens of in-person interviews.

This is what we heard:

  • Fostering inclusivity through innovation. A national vision that inspires every Canadian with equal opportunity to create and innovate in today’s digital world will have a resounding impact on Canada’s culture and economy.
  • Re-imagining what and how skills are taught in educational institutions at all levels. According to the World Economic Forum, by 2020, one-third of all jobs will require complex problem solving skills. Critical thinking, analytical, digital data and interpersonal skills will also be core requirements. To prepare Canadian students for this future workforce, partnerships are needed to ensure every student has access to this skills training.
  • Breaking down silos between the arts and business communities. Innovation is taking place across sectors, and if we are to succeed in the new economy, startup communities and innovation clusters must be welcoming to all.
  • Reflecting Canada’s creativity, innovation and entrepreneurialism in national branding and in public spaces. Canadian values are rooted in peace, order and good governance, but a lesser-told story is the reality that Canada is also brimming with creators, innovators and risk-takers. To instil confidence and pride in Canadian-made content, products and services, now is the time to augment Canada’s brand and procurement practices to reflect these core values.

The report includes more than 20 top ideas from participants across Canada to accomplish these goals. To learn about them, download the full report here.